Some Implications of Becoming a Large Organization

Over the last decade, we’ve had enormous growth in our organization. We now have over 3,000 employees, nearly two-thirds with limited vocational options because of a disability or other barrier. We also have over 3,100 students in the ten schools we operate and 450 first-time moms and expectant moms enrolled in Nurse-Family Partnership. Our total revenues this year will be approximately $130 million. For a not-for-profit, we are a big organization.

Our size has many positive aspects. We have been able to attract a higher level of managerial and professional talent than was possible before, and this has enabled us to become substantially more productive and decrease the percentage of our revenue we spend on overhead.

Even more importantly, our heightened capabilities have also made it possible for us to greatly enhance the scope and quality of our mission-related services and develop new approaches that have substantially increased our long term impact in the lives of people and in the communities in which we operate. The work we are doing today is by far the best in our history.

But there’s also a downside.

The bigger and more visible we are, the bigger target we become. In addition to having a lot of employees, students, and people served in various other parts of our organization, we now have 2 million donation transactions and 5 million customer transactions a year. Bottom line: We have a lot of opportunities to make people like us or mad at us. And nearly all of them have access to social media.

We are also a complex organization that has been changing rapidly – especially over the last five years. Regardless of how much we’ve done to tell our story, most people have no idea of much of what we do. Perception always lags reality.

Moreover, while we have a lot of wonderful people doing terrific work, our organization is composed of 3,000 human beings, and not one of us is perfect. All institutions have flaws, and despite all the good work we do and all the improvements we have made, there is nothing we do that can’t be improved even more.

We always hope that those who talk or write about us – for example, through social or mass media – will treat us fairly. Our positives far outweigh our shortcomings, and we hope for perspective, a sense of context, and balance. If someone publicly calls attention to a flaw or a mistake someone in our organization has made, we hope they will give proportionate attention to the good things we do. We also know, though, that in this day and age such hopes are usually unrealistic. As negative emotions tend to be stronger than positive emotions, negative stories seem to attract a lot more attention – viewers, listeners, readers – than positive stories.

So what must we do? Obviously, we need to find more effective ways to increase awareness of our mission-related services and impact. But there’s more. With greater size comes greater responsibilities, and we must hold ourselves to an ever higher standard. While continuous improvement has been one of our Five Basic Principles for 20 years, we have to do more to improve every aspect of what we do. There is never any room for complacency. We must constantly work to raise our game.

And regardless of how others – individuals or media outlets – might treat us, we must continue to treat others as we would want to be treated. We must keep our focus on the work to be done, acknowledge and correct our mistakes when we make them, and continue to uphold our values and the basic principles by which we operate. And we will continue to become ever better stewards of all our resources as we work to help improve lives and strengthen communities. Because – even if others don’t recognize it – that is who we are.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Some Implications of Becoming a Large Organization

Comments are closed.