The Seasons

A snowy winter

As I am writing this, it’s snowing – again. But it’s March – finally. And if it’s March, surely spring can’t be far off – can it?

As we approach (I think) the end of the most relentless winter – not to mention one of the snowiest and coldest – I’ve ever experienced, we’ve been reminded – with frustrating frequency – of how badly elements over which we have absolutely no control can affect our organization. Harsh winter weather adversely affects the volume of donated goods we receive and has a negative, sometimes devastating effect on our retail sales. Yet, while revenues drop, expenses rise – for snow removal, salt, higher heating bills, and the costs of higher absenteeism.

While we have no control over the weather, we do have to respond to it. We have to adapt. This year we have had to postpone or eliminate some of what we had planned to do in 2014. Some vacant positions will go unfilled, some capital expenditures will be deferred, and cost controls we’ve imposed will probably remain in place for the rest of the year. But that’s not necessarily bad. It’s a good time to do examine a lot of what we do, do some selective pruning, and become even better stewards of our resources.

It’s also worth noting that weather effects are short term, and despite the early year financial challenges, our mission is not threatened and we will continue to be a strong organization. If nothing else, this winter has reminded us that one of the reasons it’s important to have a strong balance sheet is so we can weather (pun intended) the periodic downturns and occasional external shocks that all organizations invariably experience from time to time.

Even with the constraints we’ve had to impose, we will still accomplish a lot this year. We have nine retail store projects we expect to complete in 2014 and a tenth that will be underway by the end of the year. This will mean more jobs – especially for people whose options are limited by disability or other barrier. More stores also mean more convenient places for donors to drop off goods and for bargain hunters who love to shop at Goodwill.

Our nine Excel Centers remain at capacity, and we will graduate nearly 500 students this year. Most will also earn a post-secondary credential that increases their employability.

Nurse-Family Partnership will continue to grow, as will the extent to which we are able to realize synergies across our various operations and services. For example, more of our NFP moms and Goodwill employees are enrolled in Excel Centers or are receiving job preparation and placement services from TalentSource.

There’s always been a seasonal pattern to Goodwill’s donated goods/retail operations. In the Midwest, donations of goods tend to be highest from spring through early fall, with a spike the last week of the year. Retail sales tend to be strongest when winter turns to spring and when fall weather arrives, with a spike just before Halloween (a relatively recent phenomenon).

But there is no season to the work we do to increase positive impact in the lives of people and the communities in which we operate. Employment of people with limited options is year-round, as are the Excel Centers, Nurse-Family Partnership, and other services Goodwill offers. And our emphasis on continuous improvement means exactly that – continuous.

So – despite the challenges of a winter we’ll never forget, there’s plenty of reason to be optimistic and glad to be part of the work Goodwill does. And if we get a bit crazy when spring weather finally does arrive, at least we know everyone in this part of the country will understand – and probably join in.

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